Budget Cuts Bring Class Cuts

It’s that time of year again, when students begin registering for next semester’s classes. However, students at Stony Brook University are becoming increasingly angered with the spring semester’s course offerings, or lack thereof.

Since Governor Patterson announced the SUNY-wide budget cuts, students have been encountering schedules devoid of classes needed to graduate with their majors. Both the POL and EST departments have urged their students to take needed classes over the winter or summer sessions, when less students are taking class. But as many students have pointed out, taking classes at these times is both costly and inconvenient.

“They charge extra,” said a business major, who wished to remain anonymous. “It’s irrational to think people can afford those extra charges and get here in the summer.”

Students who’ve sought out help, according to this source, have been told that the lack of classes is something departments can’t do anything about. The departments’ solutions involving both POL and EST have been highly advocating spending the breaks at the University.

With New York State constituents angry, as budget cuts threaten public elementary, middle and high schools as well, it is a hope that senators will fight harder for all public school funding and that Governor Patterson will finally see that education is not a place to cut corners. 

Disability Support Services: A great resource at SBU

Krystan Lenhart, a senior psychology and political science student, had a rough semester this fall. Born with cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that permanently affects body movements and muscle coordination, Lenhart was able to control her disabilities for years through medication. Unfortunately, this past summer her condition drastically took a turn for the worse. Her body, not responding to the medication, started having a series of episodes where her muscles stretched painfully, leaving her momentarily incapacitated.  Due to this she couldn’t walk anymore and started moving around in a wheelchair, at least until her situation can be corrected. Continue reading

Who Shot Rock and Roll

I had seen posters and promotions almost everywhere around the city for this exhibit. For a while it was almost impossible to get on the subway or walk the streets and not see a billboard for this exhibit. Although it was everywhere it didn’t catch my attention at first. It wasn’t untill I saw some of the photos from the exhibit that were displayed that I started to take an interest. The exhibit has been going on for two months now and it will continue to go on until the end of next month at the Brooklyn Museum. Click here for more information.

Job Search in the Recession

It’s difficult facing the challenges of todays job market. The repercussions of the recession are felt everywhere. Some college students are worried about what this impact may have on them in the near future. Job Search  Page  features Stony Brook Students who express these concerns.

Spanish Paella part 2: the recipe

Making a paella is not an easy thing. You have to learn to measure the rice in relation to the rice and vice versa, and the only way to do it is through practice. Nevertheless, once you learn to use the “eye-meter,” a paella can be a very easy and satisfying dish to do for any occasion. Start practicing! Continue reading

Spanish Paella part 1: the basics

I can say with almost absolute certainty that very few restaurants in the U.S know how to cook a paella. Despite being sold everywhere and anywhere here, the yellow rice with a few vegetables and some shrimps that they try to pass for paella is NOT a paella.

I’m from Spain, and having savored hundreds of paellas during my life (and cooked), I’m kind of an expert on it by now. People think that paella is a dish typical of all Spain, but it isn’t. The truth is that there many variations of this dish, all depending on the geographical region of Spain. The most commonly known is that from Valencia, known as paella valenciana. It has more vegetables than other variations, and is made with rabbit and chicken. There is also the paella marinera, or seafood paella. Continue reading

The Backpack Program

On a Friday afternoon in rural Moberly Missouri, needy children pick up a backpack before they leave school.  The backpack program was started by teachers in the elementary school who realized many of their students go hungry over the weekend. I read about the effects the recession has had on some families on CNN.

Hungry students tell a  teacher who then reaches out to a parent.  If the parents agrees, the teacher leaves a backpack lined by a wall at the school.  They don’t want to embarrass the child, so teachers don’t write names on the pack.

The weekend supplies include peanut butter,  canned fruit, cereal bars and ravioli.  I was touched by the teachers initiative and stunned at the effects the recession has had on America’s children. The story of these kids sure makes me even more grateful.

Photos from:http://www.cnn.com/2009/OPINION/11/22/greene.hunger.backpacks/index.html