Disability Support Services: A great resource at SBU

Krystan Lenhart, a senior psychology and political science student, had a rough semester this fall. Born with cerebral palsy, a neurological disorder that permanently affects body movements and muscle coordination, Lenhart was able to control her disabilities for years through medication. Unfortunately, this past summer her condition drastically took a turn for the worse. Her body, not responding to the medication, started having a series of episodes where her muscles stretched painfully, leaving her momentarily incapacitated.  Due to this she couldn’t walk anymore and started moving around in a wheelchair, at least until her situation can be corrected. Continue reading

The difficulties of being a non-traditional student

Ok, here we go..

I’m 27 years old, from Europe, I have a significant other, a beautiful 2-year-old son, a cat, a dog, and plenty of bills to pay, clothes to wash, toys to pick-up and supermarket trips to make. But, I also have school, and by that I mean double-major, full-time course load university school. Continue reading

SBU Hilton Hotel: To build or not to build?

Last Friday I attended a debate between Stony Brook University Vice President for Facilities & Services Barbara Chernow and Professor Malcolm Bowman of the School of Marine and Atmospheric Sciences at the SAC’s Auditorium. The issue at hand? Whether if it was right to proceed with the construction of a five story, 135 room Hilton hotel right at SBU’s Main Entrance. Continue reading

The best Spanish restaurant in NYC

 

I have tried a few restaurants that offer dishes from Spain, but many have disappointed me. Spanish cuisine is very rich and varied, but it doesn’t have burritos or tacos. Surprisingly, the best restaurant for Spanish food in New York belongs to an American chef: Seamus Mullen. Continue reading

Spanish Paella part 2: the recipe

Making a paella is not an easy thing. You have to learn to measure the rice in relation to the rice and vice versa, and the only way to do it is through practice. Nevertheless, once you learn to use the “eye-meter,” a paella can be a very easy and satisfying dish to do for any occasion. Start practicing! Continue reading

Spanish Paella part 1: the basics

I can say with almost absolute certainty that very few restaurants in the U.S know how to cook a paella. Despite being sold everywhere and anywhere here, the yellow rice with a few vegetables and some shrimps that they try to pass for paella is NOT a paella.

I’m from Spain, and having savored hundreds of paellas during my life (and cooked), I’m kind of an expert on it by now. People think that paella is a dish typical of all Spain, but it isn’t. The truth is that there many variations of this dish, all depending on the geographical region of Spain. The most commonly known is that from Valencia, known as paella valenciana. It has more vegetables than other variations, and is made with rabbit and chicken. There is also the paella marinera, or seafood paella. Continue reading

The morning after: Reflections of a Black Friday

I wasn’t up at 3 am on Friday waiting for Best Buy or Walmart to open their doors, but I went shopping for those too-good-to-be-true deals reasonably early. At 8 am I was cruising the aisles of  Target, eager to buy a portable DVD player I had seen advertised. When I arrived at the Electronics section, a fence was surrounding the area and dozens of people were yelling trying to get the attentions of the confused staff. At one point one of the Target employees grabbed a megaphone and started listing what was available auction-style. “I have 13, I repeat 13, VIZIO 42″ flat screen TV’s left at the low price of $650!” he said. The people there just went ballistics. “I want one, hey, I want one!,” a woman yelled. After ten minutes, people with huge boxes started leaving  and a new group started to come in. Continue reading